Home Gardening Greenfingers 24- Growing Roses

Greenfingers 24- Growing Roses

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  By William Mills

Does the perfect houseplant exist? A firm favourite would be one with a profusion of brightly coloured, scented flowers which last all summer coming from an easy to grow, maintenance free plant which doesn’t take up too much space.

Roses seem go a long way to match these expectations, but can they be truly house plants given they have sharp spiky thorns?

The easiest to buy are small floribunda, those with a profusion of small flowers, from local supermarkets. Costing a few pounds, these colourful miniatures are nonetheless over quickly and usually disappointingly fragrance free but don’t tend to have thorns.

Various specialist nurseries grow what they call, dwarf, patio or containerised roses. These can be bought online by mail order for less than £10 each. Some arrive already planted in a four litre pot, a size small enough to fit comfortably on a living room table, and soon produce Hybrid-T, or traditional sized roses with some fragrance, although not perhaps as much as their full outdoor garden bedded cousins.

Others arrive ‘bare root’ in a plastic bag. Although this keeps the delivery costs down it entails a visit to the garden centre for the appropriate pot and compost. Both types need to be well watered so either stand outside or place in the kitchen sink and give it a good initial drenching.

Rose varieties are also called bedding, rambling and wall climbing. Below are so images of roses both growing in the garden and indoor varieties.

David Austen Fragrant English Rose Wisley 2008
David Austen Fragrant English Rose Wisley 2008

 

Three cuttings were taken about six months ago in October 2013 these are shown below

 

rose cuttings in English garden
rose cuttings in English garden

 

These have just been re potted. First a bucket was filled with garden compost then organic chicken manure pellets are stirred in.

 

Garden compost New Horizon organic poultry manure
Garden compost New Horizon organic poultry manure

 

Next the plant is added.

 

rose cutting
rose cutting

 

The next below is a bare rooted rose received from Spalding nurseries in March 2014 and planted into an outside container.

 

Spalding
Spalding

 

Likewise this one below…I wonder which will flower first…the jam jar contains a sweet mixture to capture the wasps..

 

IMG_9318

 

Moving to the indoor varieties next, which were bought in March 2014 from Rumwood Nurseries. These arrived already potted and flowered after about six weeks. The flowers have only a very light fragrance.

 

Rumwood 'Sweet Magic'  7/3/14
Rumwood ‘Sweet Magic’ 7/3/14

 

Sweet Magic 20/4/14
Sweet Magic 20/4/14

 

However it’s small enough to be carried around the house and the thorns haven’t caused a problem.

 

Sweet Magic 20/4/14
Sweet Magic 20/4/14

 

The flower head below was beautiful to behold…

 

Sweet Magic
Sweet Magic

 

However after this the plant went downhill so by 10 May it was a far cry from its former glory…

 

Sweet Magic 10/5/14
Sweet Magic 10/5/14

 

The Second potted rose from Rumwood Nurseries, ‘Sweet Dream’, again arriving on 7 March took a little longer to initially flower…

 

Rumwood Sweet Dream (left) 20/4/14
Rumwood Sweet Dream (left) 20/4/14

 

But it was well worth the wait…these pictures show the plant both in an outside patio….

 

IMG_9366

 

And indoors……..

 

IMG_9449

 

A lovely display of flowers, yet small enough to be swiftly carried around…

 

Rumwood Sweet Dream 14/5/14
Rumwood Sweet Dream 14/5/14

 

Again the fragrance is so faint… so next step will be encouraging the commercial nurseries to invent one!

 

IMG_9554

 

 

 

 

 

 

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